A further report to the Indian Rights Association on the proposed removal of the Southern Utes by Francis Fisher Kane

Cover of: A further report to the Indian Rights Association on the proposed removal of the Southern Utes | Francis Fisher Kane

Published by Indian Rights Association in [Philadelphia] .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • Ute Indians.

Edition Notes

Book details

StatementFrancis Fisher Kane, Frank M. Ritter, committee.
Series[Publications / Indian Rights Association -- 1st series, Indian Rights Association (Series) -- 1st ser.
ContributionsRiter, Frank M., Indian Rights Association.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsE93 .I42 1892
The Physical Object
Pagination32 p. :
Number of Pages32
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14008929M
LC Control Number02017925

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: A Further Report To The Indian Rights Association On The Proposed Removal Of The Southern Utes () (): Francis Fisher Kane, Frank M. Riter: Books. Indian Rights Association. Further report to the Indian Rights Association on the proposed removal of the Southern Utes. [Philadelphia]: Indian Rights Association, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Francis Fisher Kane; Frank M Riter; Indian Rights Association.

The map is by Frances Fisher Kane from A Further Report to the Indian Rights Association on the Proposed Removal of the Southern Utes, Courtesy of Author: Durango Herald Staff. The map is by Frances Fisher Kane from A Further Report to the Indian Rights Association on the Proposed Removal of the Southern Utes, Courtesy of Andrew Gulliford collection Coloradans complained the long, narrow shape of the reservation presented a barrier to whites living on each : Durango Herald Staff.

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A further report to the Indian Rights Association on the proposed removal of the Southern Utes / ([Philadelphia]: Indian Rights Association, ), by Francis Fisher Kane, Frank M. Riter, and Indian Rights Association (page images at HathiTrust).

A Further Report to the Indian Rights Association on the Proposed Removal of the Southern Utes (), Francis Fisher Kane, Frank M.

Riter Becoming a Person of Influence - How to Positively Impact on the Lives of. Phil., Indian Rights Asso- ciation,Indian Rights Association Protest by the executive committee of the Indian Rights Association 12 GOVERNMENT RELATIONS against the passage of Senator Pettigrew's bill for the removal of the lower Erule Indians to tb.e Rosebud Reserve.

Phil., Indian Rights Association, The first book to issue from the Mormon press in Trip to southern Utah with Brigham Young in by the wife of Colonel Thomas L. Kane. CSmH, CtY, DLC, ICN, MH, NjP, NN, TxDaM-D, UHi, UPB, USlC, UU Kane, Francis Fisher.A further report to the Indian Rights Association on the proposed removal of the Southern Utes.

[Philadelphia, Press. The Indian Rights Association: the Herbert Welsh years, A further report to the Indian Rights Association on the proposed removal of the Southern Utes by Indian Rights Association () 8 editions published.

The Indian Rights Association (IRA) was a white (European-American) social activist group dedicated to the well being and acculturation of American d by non-Indians in Philadelphia inthe Indian Rights Associations (IRA) was highly influential in American Indian policy through the s and remained involved as an organization until A Further Report to the Indian Rights Association on the Proa Further Report to the Indian Rights Association on the Proposed Removal of the Southern Utes () Posed Removal of the Southern Utes () Francis Fisher Kane.

10 Sep This banner text can have markup. web; books; video; audio; software; images; Toggle navigation. Kane, Francis F., and Frank M. Riter. “A Further Report to the Indian Rights Association on the Proposed Removal of the Southern Utes,” 20 January Utah State Historical Society, Salt Lake City.

Kearns, Timothy M. “Aceramic Sites and the Archaic Occupation along the Middle San Juan River, Southeast Utah.” Paper presented at the.

Text of Indian Civil Rights Act. The Indian Civil Rights Act of (ICRA) (see Federal Laws), 25 U.S.C.§§ (ICRA), provides as follows: § Definitions: For purposes of this subchapter, the term "Indian tribe" means any tribe, band, or other group of Indians subject to the jurisdiction of the United States and recognized as.

Indian Removal Act, ( ), first major legislative departure from the U.S. policy of officially respecting the legal and political rights of the American act authorized the president to grant Indian tribes unsettled western prairie land in exchange for their desirable territories within state borders (especially in the Southeast), from which the tribes would be removed.

Georgia—asserted the rights of non-natives to live on Indian lands. Samuel Worcester was a Christian missionary and federal postmaster of New Echota, the capital of the Cherokee nation.

A Congregationalist, he had gone to live among the Cherokee in Georgia to further the spread of Christianity, and he strongly opposed Indian removal. Contains an article entitled "Southern Ute Rehabilitation Planning: a study in Self-Determination," by Robert C. Euler and Harry L.

Naylor (), The Story of the Southern Utes (), A Report to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs by the Southern Ute Tribe () and a pamphlet from the State Historical Society of Colorado (). The scope of the Handbook is as comprehensive as its function necessitates.

It treats of all the tribes north of Mexico, including the Eskimo, and those tribes south of the boundary more or less affiliated with those in the United States.

It has been the aim to give a brief description of every linguistic stock, confederacy, tribe, subtribe or tribal division, and settlement known to history.

Further report to the Indian rights association on the proposed removal of the southern Utes. [Philadelphia, ] EU8 I3 [n.p., ?] Captivity and deliverance of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson, of Lancaster, who was taken by the French and Indians.

American Indian tribes have suffered discrimination and injustice at the hands of the government since the country’s founding, yet contemporary civil rights discussions all too often ignore the rights of American Indians.

American Indian communities are among the most impoverished in the nation, and the stigma of past discrimination regularly rears its head in the spheres of.

Indian Rights Association. Title Indian Rights Association records ID Date [inclusive]undated Extent Linear feet boxes; 38 volumes; 1 flat file Author Finding aid prepared by Willhem Echevarria, Jenna Marrone, and D'Arcy White. Sponsor This collection was processed as part of the Civic Engagement Collections Project.

Indian Rights Association records Collection 1 The Historical Society of Pennsylvania Indian Rights Association Records, ca. boxes, 63 vols., linear feet Collection Abstract Founded in Philadelphia inthe Indian Rights Association’s purpose was to “bring. The Indian Reorganization Act of Jor the Wheeler-Howard Act, was U.S.

federal legislation that dealt with the status of Native Americans (known in law as American Indians or Indians). It was the centerpiece of what has been often called the "Indian New Deal".The major goal was to reverse the traditional goal of assimilation of Indians into American society and to strengthen.

President Andrew Jackson’s Native American policy favored their removal to the west. The idea for Indian removal was not new—President Thomas Jefferson proposed an exchange of Indian lands east of the Mississippi for land in western territory—but Jackson was the first President to act on it.

He pushed the Indian Removal Act through Congress ingiving the President power to. Centered around internal sovereignty. 's legislation that gave Indians greater control of their own affairs and provided further funding for schools and hospitals, but was very watered down compared to John Collier's, head of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, original scheme.

How did Dr. Thomas Bland of the National Indian Defense Association recast the so-called "Indian Problem" at the time of Grant's peace policy. He proposed an ambitious federal plan to develop western water and farming resources, which Congress ignored until the s. → Dawes was a leader of the Indian Rights Association and wanted.

Letter from the Secretary of the Interior: transmitting report of Commissioner of Indian Affairs relative to the amount appropriated March 3,for Cherokee Nation, and legislation to protect the rights of adopted citizens of said nation ([Washington D.C.: G.P.O., ]), by United States.

Dept. of the Interior (page images at HathiTrust). In the end, those in favor of the Indian Removal Act saw the opportunities for America to increase its territory, political power and influence, and a better economy. Andrew Jackson called for the removal of Indians from American territory, making him a supporter of the Indian Removal Act of   the indian removal act ofreservation opression I have decided to dive into the depths of the American Indians and the reasoning behind all of the poverty and the oppression of the “white man.” In doing so I came across a couple of questions that I would like to answer.

How did the Indian Removal Act of affect Native American culture, financial status, health, and B). The Indian Reorganization Act of Jor the Wheeler-Howard Act, was U.S. federal legislation that dealt with the status of American was the centerpiece of what has been often called the "Indian New Deal".The major goal was to reverse the traditional goal of assimilation of Indians into American society and to strengthen, encourage and perpetuate the tribes and their.

During the Indian Rights Association uncovered irregularities in practices of the Commission to the Five Tribes itself.

The investigation revealed that all members of the commission, including its chairman, Tams Bixby, were high officials of various private trust companies that leased and managed estates for Indian allottees. A full Index on page THE CONDITION OF AFFAIRS IN INDIAN TERRITORY AND CALIFORNIA.

A REPORT BY PROF. PAINTER, AGENT OF THE INDIAN RIGHTS ASSOCIATION. PHILADELPHIA: OFFICE OF THE INDIAN RIGHTS ASSOCIATION, NO. ARCH STREET. PRICE 25 CENTS. 2 We invite the closest examination and the most thorough discussion of our work.

Comparing Catholic and Protestant missionaries in North America can be a herculean task. It means comparing many religious groups, at least five governments, and hundreds of groups of Indians. But missions to the Indians played important roles in social, cultural, and political changes for Indians, Europeans, and Americans from the very beginning of contact in the s to the present.

the Indian. National organizations such as the Women's National Indian Association and the Indian Rights Association took the lead in establish-ing missions, sending educational and medical workers into the field, and acting as watchdogs against attempts to further usurp Indian lands.

Both. Signed into law by President Andrew Jackson onthe Indian Removal Act authorized the president to grant unsettled lands west of the Mississippi River in exchange for Indian lands within existing state borders. Before becoming president, Jackson had been a long-time proponent of Indian removal.

Inhe commanded the U.S. military forces that defeated a faction of the Creek. The proposal of Indian Removal debated in the US Congress was a straightforward expression of that expansionism, which dispensed with the past policies of the US that had combined expansion with treaty negotiations that had the form of a meeting and agreements of equals, and proclamations of Indian rights and sovereignty.

There was a national. Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs to the Secretary of the Interior for the Year Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, p.

Index. /GC Unan/ Annual Reports of the Executive Committee of the Indian Rights Association. Gertrude Simmons BonninNative American activist and writer of the Sioux tribe Gertrude Simmons Bonnin () was prominent in the Pan-Indian movement of the s and s. She devoted her life to lobbying for the rights of Native Americans.

Source for information on Gertrude Simmons Bonnin: Encyclopedia of World Biography dictionary.THE JOURNAL OF THE HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION OF SOUTHERN FLORIDA Editor: Charlton W. Tebeau NUMBER XXXIV CONTENTS "The Friends of the Seminole" Society, By Harry A.

Kersey, Jr. 3_o Judge Henry Hudson Hancock, By Ruby Jane Hancock Ernest Graham and the Hialeah Charter Fight of By Peter G. Klingman7Foreign Colonies in.Garfield Poca1 M a r k Twain, The Works of Mark Twain, with Foreword and Explanatory Notes by Franklin R.

Rogers, vol. 2: Roughing It (Berkeley: University of California, ), p. ; Richard N.

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